The Angels: “The New Recruits”

Original run: The New Lady Penelope #53 – #57

Writer: Unknown

Artist: Jon Davies

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The New Lady Penelope, #54

Much like how the Lady Penelope comic gave readers a marvellous back-story into how Marina became mute after battling Titan, they went one step further and showed readers just how the Angels became the Angels. Unfortunately, compared to the 23-part Marina adventure, this first strip (of several focusing on the Angels) is a bit, well… crappy.

“The New Recruits” is a quick, pleasant breeze of a read, and only clocks in at five pages in length, one page for each instalment, just like Marina’s first story. But where “How the Mysterious and Beautiful Marina May Never Speak Again” (try saying that when you’re drunk on seaweed wine) ebbs and flows with a gallop littered with hooks for the reader, “The New Recruits” is far less rewarding from a story-telling perspective.

The story sees Dianne Simms, delivery girl for Airways Light Freight Agency, receiving a mysterious package and rendezvous destination. There, she meets pilot Karen Wainwright, Juliette Pontoin, Magnolia Jones and Chan Kwan, who have also been given strange orders. A mysterious voice, unwilling to identify itself, booms over them, revealing that their packages contain matching uniforms, and then displays five interceptor aircraft at their feet. Things get even weirder when the unknown voice promises the five pilots the danger and excitement they’ve been longing for since taking to the skies for the first time, but will their first flight in these new aircraft prove to be more dangerous than they can cope with?

Is it just me, or do those craft look... green?
Is it just me, or do those craft look… green?

Perhaps the real question here is who thought it was a good idea to let Jon Davies illustrate this strip?

Maybe we’ve all grown up on too much Frank Bellmy’s Thunderbird 2 or Mike Noble’s Zero-X, but when you absorb Davies’ take on the Angels, both the pilots and craft, you’d better have a good imagination, because you’ll need that to really bring his doodle to life.

He doesn’t get anything wrong per-say, if anything he clearly illustrated this with the series bible next to him, but the combination of a rough, scrappy appearance, a lack of diversity in colour and the craft themselves being restricted to cramped panels makes for less than impressive viewing. Was it simply a case of the Angels not being in TV Century 21, and therefore not commanding a substantial amount of popularity?

The script itself, its writer of which is lost in the depths of time, fairs better than the artwork it has to put up with, but at a mere five pages in length there ain’t a lot of room for a genuine plot to kick off. As a brief, introductory prequel to how the Angels kick-started their adventures, “The New Recruits” works on that level. Further adventures saw the Angels being sent off on more mission by the mysterious voice, which actually brings into question just how desperate for excitement they are in their lives!

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The New Lady Penelope #56

“The New Recruits” does bear some handsome references to the Angel’s back-stories and personal lives, again hinting at the writer’s attention to detail when scribbling out this short flight of fancy. There’s even a moment of rare confrontation where Dianne actually address the fact that the women in Century 21 don’t get a lot of breaks, and that most of the best piloting jobs end up in the hands of the lads.

So, to cap off – is this strip worth reading? Well, it’s an interesting piece of fiction in the Andercon comic canon, but it won’t change your life. It may be best to read other Angels strips from the Lady Penelope comic to get the full picture, if you can hunt copies down that is.

For those seeking adventure as high-flying as the Angels, you’d be best to stick to TV Century 21, but for fans of the Angels and Captain Scarlet in general, your appetite may well be whetted.

You can read “The New Recruits” in Egmont’s The Gerry Anderson Comic Collection

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