Stingray: “Escape from Aquatraz” Part 2: “The Uranium Plant Invasion”

Original run: TV Century 21 #38 – #44

Writer: Alan Fennell

Artist: Ron Embleton

TV Century 21 #38
TV Century 21 #38

Oh Stingray. Stingray, Stingray, Stingray. Why was it that Thunderbirds, Zero-X, Fireball XL5 and Captain Scarlet got all the wondrous badassery in their TV 21 adventures, but you got stuck with a chunk of sub-par adventures that somehow showed a lot of promise and excitement, but for some reason fell flat on their faces nearly 100% of the time?

“Escape from Aquatraz”, the epic saga spanning two individual stories across 27 pages, was an adventure full of explosive action, human drama, and even the close Titan ever came to eliminating the World Aquanaut Security Patrol from his map for conquering the land people. Unfortunately for me, I didn’t find a lot to get my blood pumping in Part 1 of this saga. However, “Escape from Aquatraz”‘s second chapter, “The Uranium Plant Invasion”, has a lot more going for it than the previous episode, but is not entirely without sin.

u1Spiralling out from the events of “Aquatraz”, Marshal Ketov suspends Commander Shore from duty after he’s captured by Titan. Fortunately, Troy and Phones managed to free Ketov, but that doesn’t stop Marinville nearly going up in smoke when its leader is relieved of duty. Meanwhile, Titan sets to work fusing his Terror Fish with the atomic power found in the captured Bathescape he stole from Ketov in “Aquatraz”, preparing a full-scale assault on the world!

Woah woah woah, wait there a second… Am I right in thinking we actually got a pretty awesome set-up for a Stingray story… in a TV 21 comic?! What is this mad bullsh*ttery? If you wanted a decent Stingray story, you stuck to the TV show! Or maybe the John Theydon novels, but perhaps that’s for another blog.

41So, does the set-up of “The Uranium Plant Invasion” fully deliver? Well, kinda. But for a Stingray strip in TV 21, ‘kinda’ was the best we could ever hope for.

The dueling plots of Titan assembling an unstoppable army of Terror Fish and Commander Shore being stripped of his position make for enticing reading, but it’s debatable whether both these stories are handled in a well enough manner. The resolution to Commander Shore’s sub-plot feels a little too quick to have any real impact on the story, almost as if once it is resolved, then the strip can begin its actual story.

The strip’s main plot is a growling beast of a build-up to a promising finale, showing Titan finally delivering on his world-domination ambitions. He successfully captures a humongous W.A.S.P. base full of the stuff needed to advance his cause, and uses it to develop a terrifyingly powerful armada of Terror Fish. During the first few instalments, this plot easily scuppers the Commander Shore on trial story, and displays Titan with a genuine sense of menace.

On the other hand, one could argue that these two plots interweave in and out of each other playfully, and both finish in each other’s laps ready for the big finale, which sadly also feels a little rushed. In a nutshell, Titan’s captured uranium workers are forced to galvanise the Terror Fish’s capabilities, but it takes Troy to tell them to adjust their uranium formulas ever so slightly so that Stingray may have the upper hand.

u2That’s all well and good, but it basically amounts to the fact that out of a town-sized uranium plant (yep, that’s how the strip itself describes the complex) full of workers, not one of them knew that by changing their methods they could beat Titan? And the person to let them know this was someone who DIDN’T work with uranium?!

Ron Embleton also fails to make a significant impact on the strip. There isn’t any of the iconic panelling that Frank Bellamy or Mike Noble gave their various Anderson strips. However, he still gleefully gambles across the story with his simple yet thick and glossy artwork, but that can’t save the anti-climactic feel “The Uranium Plant Invasion” has.

Overall, this and the “Escape from Aquatraz” adventure as a whole aren’t really bad, they’re simply disappointing, because we’re given such fruitful beginnings that ultimately turn sour, and leave a bitter after-taste. Would “Escape from Aquatraz” have worked better not being a two-parter? Perhaps, but given Stingray‘s reputation in TV 21, we may be pushing ourselves.

Have you read “The Uranium Plant Invasion”? What did you think of it? Let us know in the comments section or send us a Tweet! You can read “The Uranium Plant Invasion” in Stingray – Battle Stations and Century 21 Vol. 3: Escape from Aquatraz!

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